Climate Change - A Coastal Crisis - Lamu

The coastal areas of Lamu County in northeast Kenya are rich in biodiversity, both marine and terrestrial. The area experiences many similar development challenges and socio- economic characteristics as other rural areas in Kenya, including high poverty levels, low education, and variable health.
The communities are predominantly (80%) Bajun – a mix of Arab and Bantu ancestry. Inland (in the Boni- Dodori forest) are the Aweer people - former hunter-gatherers who now rely on small-scale agriculture and honey- harvesting. In 1996, WWF initiated collaborative management with the main purpose of establishing institutional and regulatory framework for effective management of Kiunga Marine National Reserve.
The aim of this project is to visually explore the climate-related vulnerabilities and adaptive capacity of the communities living within and adjacent to Lamu Land/Seascape, based on two objectives:
To understand community resource use and how this has been affected by climate.
To understand the community’s experience of changes in climate and how this has affected their livelihoods.
It is clear that both ecosystems and the livelihoods that depend on them in the Lamu land/ seascape are vulnerable to climate change, and will continue to be in the light of the projected future climate exposure (which anticipates continued modification to the timing of the Kusi (SEM) and Kaskasi (NEM) monsoon systems, with a decrease in total rainfall between June and September and increase in extreme rainfall in October and November). Although communities are responding to current changes, improved awareness and understanding of the current vulnerabilities and future projected climate would greatly improve their capacity to adapt, and ensure that negative livelihood and resource outcomes do not occur. Overcoming these barriers to adaptation is a priority.

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De Lamu à Nairobi, la saga de la lutte anti-charbon au Kenya.

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Mohamed Somo, porte-parole des pêcheurs de Lamu.

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Member, Lamu resource Center

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Lamu Resource Center

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Fishermen along the coasts of Lamu

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Fisherman in Kipungani

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Women weaving.

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L’âne est le seul moyen de transport de la vieille cité classée de Lamu.

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Along the coast of Lamu Town.

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Inside Lamu Town

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Kipungni Primary School - Lamu

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Tana River - Longest River in Kenya.

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A view of a mining site from a homestead. This is the home of Katsozu Katana (front-left) having their lunch. Katsozu has nine children. The family experiences negative affluents from mining activities. Dust and noise from the site have caused illnesses among family members.

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A view of a mining site from a homestead. This is the home of Katsozu Katana (front-left) having their lunch. Katsozu has nine children. The family experiences negative affluents from mining activities. Dust and noise from the site have caused illnesses among family members.

Access to weather and climate information

Access to weather and climate information is also a critical prerequisite that determines whether communities are able to effectively respond to climate change. Decisions relating particularly to temporal diversification, for example, will likely be more effective if farmers (in particular, since temporal diversification is a key strategy for them) have some idea of what the weather will be like over the coming season. It can reduce their likelihood of crop loss by ensuring that they plant at the right time, particularly since increasing unpredictability means the traditional notion of waiting until the rains to start to plant is often unreliable. The women of Mkokoni explained that when they know low rainfall is predicted, they plant on less acreage to reduce the risk of loss; or they plant sesame or crops that require little rainfall.
Non-climate-driven vulnerability: environmental change Natural resource availability has also been affected by climate and environmental change, as well as human activities. Resource degradation and unsustainable practices were observed in the terrestrial communities. The Ziwani men explained how overgrazing of livestock leads to the siltation of the lake. There has also been a loss of trees in the area due to clear cutting and charcoal burning, and general overharvesting of mangrove resources 41 (according to the women from Amu and Ndambwe and the men from Ndau). Reduction in mangrove trees in turn reduces fish nurse

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A view of a mining site from a homestead that leads to land degradation.

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A view of a mining site from a homestead. This is the home of Katsozu Katana (front-left) having their lunch. Katsozu has nine children. The family experiences negative affluents from mining activities. Dust and noise from the site have caused illnesses among family members.

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A view of a mining site from a homestead. This is the home of Katsozu Katana (front-left) having their lunch. Katsozu has nine children. The family experiences negative affluents from mining activities. Dust and noise from the site have caused illnesses among family members.

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A view of a mining site from a homestead. This is the home of Katsozu Katana (front-left) having their lunch. Katsozu has nine children. The family experiences negative affluents from mining activities. Dust and noise from the site have caused illnesses among family members.

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